Swimming in the Sea of Mysteries

 – Hyunseung Hong –  For as long as I can remember, my scientific pursuits have given me the eyes to see and understand the world around me. I was intrigued by science because it allowed me to better understand how my body worked. Ergo, it mattered and made sense for me to pursue studies in…

How Can We Help? Creating the Superwomen in Science Podcast

 – Cordon Purcell & Nicole George – In the fall of 2016, we were both in our first year of grad school and living together in Montreal (Cordon was sleeping on a crappy air mattress in Nicole’s living room). As friends from undergrad, we were happy to both be in the same city for our…

The first stories in science book is published!

We are thrilled to announce that our first book Journeys in Science: Inspiring the Next Generation has finally been published by Elsevier! The book is a conversation between Drs. Fanuel Muindi and Jessica W. Tsai which examines the STEM education pipeline and discusses important strategies on working through the various challenges that STEM trainees face. The conversation in the…

Academic dreams: they come and they go

 – Bill Hinchen –  Is it time I let go of the academic dream? I seem to have been battling with this question for several years now. For as long as I can remember, I wanted to do science — I mean proper science: lab coats, experiments, late nights peering down a microscope, and the obligatory assortment of…

Better Get Used to Me

– Taylor Richardson | High School Student | The Bolles School –  Speech below was delivered at the 2017 March for Science in Washington, D.C.  My name is Taylor Richardson, I live in Jacksonville, Florida where I attend The Bolles School. I am 13 years old and I am not just a black girl who’s…

Discovering my Passion for Teaching

– Jennifer Gatti | Buckingham Browne & Nichols School – Throughout my life, the message has always been clear: find your passion and love what you do because if you don’t, you might dread getting out of bed every day. I’m happy to say that I absolutely LOVE what I do every day. Although it…

Playing in the Dirt and Calling it Science

 – By Stephanie Halmhofer | Bioarchaeologist –  For some, the line from point A to point B is fairly straight.  For others, it’s a zig-zag.  I am definitely a zig-zagger.  I didn’t find an easy, straightforward path into becoming a bioarchaeologist.  To be honest, I don’t think any “easy” path in any career actually exists. …

Little Black Bear

–  Timothy Alex Akimoff – It was a sunny, winter day in Northwest Montana, and my newspaper editor dispatched me to a rural valley, where I was to meet Jaime Jonkel, “The Bear Guy,” from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. A two-year old black bear woke up too early from its long winter nap, and…

How To Be a Superstar With No Instructions

– Marguerite Matthews –  At 4 years old, I was sure I’d be a superstar! My father has endless video recordings of me prancing around, belting out my favorite songs or performing mundane tasks with Shakespearean theatrics. I was ready at a moment’s notice to give the camera – and whoever was around – the performance of a lifetime. Then, after seeing The…

Scientist, Educator, or Both?

 – Khameeka Kitt-Hopper, Ph.D. –  Since I was a child I have always been interested in the human body and how we are in essence “put together”.  Observing how animals were anatomically organized from watching my father prepare birds and deer he hunted to learning about science concepts in grade school opened my eyes to…

Be more confident and optimistic

– by Claudia Segovia-Salcedo | Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas ESPE | Coordinator and co-founder of the Ecuadorian Network of Women in Science (REMCI) –  The story below was originally published by The Female Scientist which aims to make the work of female scientists around the world more visible to the public. You can follow them on twitter HERE.  …

Diffraction

– Rowena Fletcher-Wood | Programme Delivery Officer at Science Oxford –  The story below by Rowena was originally published in 2014 through the Story Collider. You can listen or read it below!  When I was eighteen, I loved school and I loved working, and I was always terrified that I might run out of things to do….

NPR: An Unstoppable Scientist

– Published by Michaeleen Doucleff on NPR on June 20, 2017 –  “Two years ago, Eqbal Dauqan was going to work in the morning as usual. She’s a biochemistry professor. And was driving on the freeway, when suddenly: “I felt something hit my car, but I didn’t know what it was because I was driving…

Watch Your Step

– by Fanuel Muindi – How many steps do you take in a day? We take so many of them every day (around 6000 or so) without a care. For many of us, the focus is on our destinations. Spend some time watching some of your steps. Share some of your steps. A change of…

The Things I Can’t Not Do

– by Myron Shekelle – Research Associate, Department of Anthropology, Western Washington University –  If your job didn’t pay any money, would you continue to do it anyway? As a scientist, I have had the opportunity to know the answer to this philosopher’s question. In April 1996, I was surveying tarsiers on Malenge Island, a tiny…

Stories in Science: An Interview with Elsevier

– by Mary Preap (Associate Acquisitions Editor at Elsevier  | Originally published on SciTech Connect Elsevier on May 11 2017 –   Stories in Science is an online platform where people can share stories about their relationship with science and read stories that have been shared by others. As noted on the website, “We are surrounded by so many stories…

Making My Way from Mountains to Mud: Part 3

– by Robin McLachlan – We teach school children that science is inaccessible and scientists are socially inept. Crazy scientists hide behind lab benches. They are disguised beneath white coats and thick glasses. Their hair is disheveled, their motivations shady, their sentences long and entangled in complexity. I wasn’t impressed with this type of science. My…

Tanqueray and Rocks

– by Silas Stafford – You can’t do geology without a nice gin and tonic. It’s gotta be Tanqueray, none of this Gordon’s crap. After a few you’ll start really appreciating the change in perspective”.  Professor Shore’s voice boomed, brimming with gravid enthusiasm and filling the lecture hall as he dispensed advice for the coming field trip. Professor…

The Courage to Say No

by William Yakah | Undergraduate Student (Neuroscience) | Michigan State University | Like many others in middle school, I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to be in the future. In 6th grade, my class had a group of college students talk to us about pursuing higher education. Before they left, they gave us notebook covers that…

Why I Sci

by Natalie Hamer | Biomedical Science Student at Newcastle University | My favorite question has always been ‘why?’ As a child, this question frustrated my mother to no end. I asked her a million questions, and interrogated all of her answers. When I wasn’t demanding to know ‘why’, I could often be found with my head…

A Ride of a Lifetime

by John Kropowensky | Curriculum Coordinator at Harvard University | The relationship I have had with science has been one of many ups and downs, a roller coaster ride speeding up, stopping suddenly, and revealing the beautiful world at its peak. Science is not so different from this thrill ride. When one learns about science the…

Searching for answers as a Space Physicist

by Alessandra Abe Pacini | Space Weather Physicist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab I am the youngest child in a multi-cultural Brazilian family. I am the result of an immigration wave that happened in the beginning of the last century and brought my grandparents and great-grandparents from Italy, Japan and Lebanon to work…

Discovering my identity as a scientist

by Tyler A. Allen | NC State University, College of Veterinary Medicine |  My journey into science was a seemingly unexpected yet inevitable one. I am the first person in my family to venture into the field of science as a career. I have always had a keen interest for science, particularly biology. Learning how life…

From rural China to Harvard and beyond

By Jiang He | Postdoctoral Scholar | MIT | I grew up as a farmer in China in a pre-industrial farming society. When I was born, my village had no cars, no telephones, no electricity, not even running water. Electricity was not introduced until the 1990s, and we didn’t have our first telephone until 2001….

Ordinary Folks Doing Extraordinary Things

by David Denlinger | Department of Biology | Utah State University Everyday when we wake up, whether we recognize it or not, our lives are inspired by science: not being crippled by polio or smallpox, the food we eat, the vehicles that get us places, the clothes we wear, the technology that helps us get our…

The words that changed my life

by Lia Paola Zambetti |Senior Project Officer |Research Development and Collaboration |The University of Sydney On a dull Saturday morning in the lab, I heard the words that changed my life. I had just finished changing the medium for my cells and was chatting with the only other person around, a senior postdoc from a…